INTRO TO ANTHROPOLOGY - ONLINE MEDIA
Professor Reymers - Fall 2018


Online Media 4

OM4

Watch PBS NOVA's"Becoming Human, Part III: Last Human Standing" (YouTube, ~52 min, 2014)

Take notes during the video and answer these questions while you watch:

1. In what order of descent did the species of Homo overtake one another and when?

2. What was discovered in the caves at Atapuerca, in northern Spain and what does this say about archaic Homo sapiens (Homo heidelbergensis in this case)?

3. What is “Excalibur” and what did it signify?

4. In what ways did our ideas about Homo neandertalensis change as the 20th century proceeds?

5. What recent discovery in the Meuse Valley, Belgium, helped to refine our views of Neanderthals?

6. What kind of research is going at the Max Planck Institute in Leipzig, Germany, regarding evolutionary studies?

7. Why are children’s teeth so valuable to archaeologists?

8. Why was hunting such a risky business for Neanderthals?

9. Why did Neanderthals go extinct about 25,000 years ago?

10. What is “the bottleneck effect”?

E-mail your completed assignment:
TO: reymers@morrisville.edu
SUBJECT: ANTH4


DO NOT send as an attachment, please.

Due on or before Friday Sept 21 at 5pm sharp

(Note: for regular correspondence, do not use the above link for email, or remove the automatic subject line heading "ANTH" if you do).

Online media assignments are graded on a pass/fail basis. See the Grades webpage for results.


Online Media 3

OM3

Interactive Documentary "Becoming Human" http://www.becominghuman.org/node/interactive-documentary

Watch the Prologue and Episodes 1-12 in the following interactive documentary (note there are three 2-minute episodes in each section at the top, titled "Evidence," "Anatomy," "Lineages," and "Culture") and examine the Related Exhibits (at the bottom of each video page) as well.

Answer these related questions:

1. Who is the video's narrator, Donald Johannsen, was and explain for what discovery he is famous.

2. According the Evidence section of the Interactive exhibit (at the bottom of the screen), define the study of "taphonomy."

3. According to the Anatomy section of the Interactive exhibit, explain why researchers think that the big brains of the genus Homo evolved to grow beyond the size of earlier species.

4. In the video from the Anatomy portion of the documentary, what is the Turkana Boy?

5. According to the Lineages section of the Interactive exhibit, name the species t hat evolved about 1 million years ago.

6. In the video from the Culture section of the documentary, what is found in the Koonalda cave?

IMPORTANT: E-mail your answers (not an attachment)
TO: reymers@morrisville.edu, with the SUBJECT: ANTH3

Due Friday, Sept 14, 5pm

Credit for your answers will be shown on
the online grades page (once opened).

 


Online Media 2

OM1

Evidence for Evolution from StatedClearly.com (YouTube 11:22)

1. What are the two main claims of the theory of evolution?

2. What are the lines of evidence that support the claims of evolutionary theory?

3. How many different species are estimated to be living today?

4. How does evidence from comparative anatomy suggest that whales and other cetaceans evolved from a pre-existing four-legged land creature?

5. How does embryology help to confirm our suspicions that whales are closer to mammals than to fish in their evolutionary development?

6. How does fossil evidence from the ancient creatures called Basilosaurad and Maiacetus suggest that whales descended from these creatures?

7. How do DNA comparisons help to confirm our suspicions that whales evolve

IMPORTANT: E-mail your answers (not an attachment)
TO: reymers@morrisville.edu, with the SUBJECT: ANTH2

Due Friday, Sept 7, 5pm

Credit for your answers will be shown on
the online grades page (once opened).

 


Online Media 1

Reco1

Macat's "Introduction to Cultural Anthropology"

1. What is the definition of anthropology according to the video?

2. When and why did early anthropologists study customs and beliefs in pre-industrial societies?

3. What is the main argument of Marcel Mauss's book "The Gift"?

4. What explanation makes sense of pre-industrial people's belief in witchcraft (according to E.Evans-Pritchard?)

5. What is an example of feminist anthropology?

6. What was the thesis and result of Clifford Geertz's "Interpretation of Cultures"?

7. What is the value of historical ethnography?

IMPORTANT: E-mail your answers (not an attachment)
TO: reymers@morrisville.edu, with the SUBJECT: ANTH1

Due Friday, Aug 31, 5pm

Credit for your answers will be shown on
the online grades page (once opened).

 


 

Administrative Note: I will give you 3 chances to get the subject heading correct and to not include attachments in your online media emails to me. For example, when you sent the first online media assignment, you should have used a subject heading in the email of "ANTH3." If you wrote something else (like, for instance, "Online Media Questions 3" or "anth 3 hw"), or if you have included your assignment as an attachment, you have not paid attention to the details of the assignment instructions (details which make it crucially easier to organize your responses and read what you have written). You can do this three times without penalty, but a fourth instance of not paying attention to the details will result in a 1-point reduction from your Online Media grade. For the vast majority of you who are doing it right, thank you for paying attention to the details! - Regards, Prof Reymers

 


 

Tips on Preparing for Exams

A. Do not wait until the night before an exam to study! Of course, you should be regularly reviewing your notes, but the preparation still takes time.

B. A good first step in preparation is to read through your notes a couple of times. While you are doing this, you might also

1. Highlight major topics and subtopics, with the goal of generating an outline of your notes. Even if you take your notes in outline form, this is a good practice. Major topics often extend through more than one day's lecture, and it is easy to lose track of the overall picture from day to day.

2. With a second color, highlight all vocabulary terms.

C. Outline the entire set of notes. When you study a large body of information, you should study from concept to detail, not the other way around. It will, in fact, be much easier to learn the details if you take the time to learn the concept and theory first. The least efficient approach to studying is to attempt to memorize your notes from beginning to end. It's not the words which are important--it's the ideas.

D. Consider ways of dealing with the information other than those used in class. the more ways you can manipulate and experience the material you are trying to learn, the more secure your understanding and memory will be. Some suggestions:

1. Make charts, diagrams and graphs.
2. Make lists.
3. If the subject matter includes structures, practice drawing those structures. Remember that a drawing is useless unless the important structures are labeled.

E. There are almost always types of information which you will have to memorize (eg. vocabulary). No one has ever invented a better device for memorizing than flash cards.

F. One of the most universally effective ways to polish off your study activities is to prepare a self test.

1. Challenge yourself as severely as you can.
2. As you are studying, keep a running collection of "exam questions." If you seriously attempt to write difficult and meaningful questions, by the time you finish you will have created a formidable exam. When you begin to feel you're ready for your instructor's exam, take out your questions and see if you can answer them. If you can't, you may need to go back and reinforce some of the things your are trying to learn.

G. Never, ever pull an "All-Nighter" on the night before an exam. This is a "freshman trick," meaning that good students learn very quickly that it is futile. What you may gain from extra study time won't compensate for the loss of alertness and ability to concentrate due to lack of sleep.

H. On exam day:

1. Try not to "cram" during every spare moment before an exam. this only increases the feeling of desperation which leads to panic, and then to test anxiety. You may find it useful, on the night before an exam, to jot down a few ideas or facts which you wish to have fresh in your mind when you begin the exam. Read through your list a couple of times when you get up in the morning and/or just before you take the exam, then put it away. This kind of memory reinforcement not only improves your performance on the test, it also improves your long-term memory of the material.
2. Be physically prepared.

a. Get a good night's sleep.
b. Bring necessary writing materials to the test--at least 2 writing tools, erasers, blue books if necessary, calculators if appropriate and allowed. Be aware of what the instructor has specified as permitted for use. Some instructors object to exams written pencil; some prohibit use of tools like calculators. It is your responsibility to know these requirements; you should be prepared to take the consequences if you don't.
c. This may seem silly, but go to the bathroom just before the exam. Don't expect your teacher to let you leave to do this during the test! The tension which generally goes along with taking an exam may increase the need to perform this physical activity, so you may need to go, even though you don't particularly feel like it.

 

adapted from: http://www.cod.edu/people/faculty/fancher/study.htm